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The Best Seam Ripper: Comparing Different Seam Rippers

Learn how to use a seam ripper and which one is the best seam ripper. I compared seven different seam rippers to find the best one.

When I first started sewing, I could only afford the cheapest sewing tools. I never branched out and tested other seam rippers besides the original cheap seam ripper that I’ve always used.

I bought a bunch of different brands of seam rippers and fabric knives and tested all of them on the same fabric and thread to see which one would do the best. This is my review of the six tools I tried, and which one is the best seam ripper.

best seam ripper
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what is a seam ripper?

A seam ripper is a small hand tool used when sewing that cuts stitches. The most common design has a handle, a shaft, and a head. The head is usually forked with the sharp knife part of the seam ripper in the center of the fork.

Learn how to use a seam ripper.

Why would i need to rip out or unpick a seam?

Sometimes when you are sewing you make a mistake. You don’t like up the seams correctly or you sew something in the wrong direction. Fortunately, a seam ripper is the best tool for opening a seam because it cuts throught the stitches.

best seam ripper

The Best Seam Ripper Comparison

best seam ripper

Regular Dritz Seam Ripper

The Dritz seam ripper* is the original cheap seam ripper that I’ve always used. It’s cheap and easy to find so it’s really accessible.

The handle is a good size, but it’s pretty lightweight. The knife and point are sharp, and the metal is pretty smooth and thin. The red ball is a good size.

If you are looking for an affordable seam ripper option than this is the one to choose. I like to buy a pack so I always have another one when the one I’m using gets dull.

This seam ripper came in third place of all the seam rippers.

Singer Seam Ripper

The Singer seam ripper was a new seam ripper that I tried. The handle has a good finger grip, but the handle was a little bit long for my hand. It was also a little lightweight.

The knife was sharp, but the point was a little dull. The metal was smooth, but it was so thick I couldn’t even put it in the seam.

I wouldn’t recommend this seam ripper unless you couldn’t anything else.

This seam ripper came in fourth place of all the seam rippers.

Clover Seam Ripper

This was the first time I used the Clover seam ripper* and I was blown away. It surprisingly wasn’t that expensive.

The handle is the perfect size, and it was a really nice weight. The knife and point are really sharp, and the metal is really smooth and really thin.

If you are looking for the best seam ripper than this is the one to choose.

This seam ripper tied for first place of all the seam rippers.

Ergonomic Dritz Seam Ripper

The Dritz ergonomic seam ripper is the same brand as the affordable seam ripper, but the handle is different. The handle has a nice weight, and it’s the perfect length.

The knife and point are sharp, and the metal is smooth and thin.

This is a great option for a seam ripper.

This seam ripper tied for first place of all the seam rippers.

Fiskars Fabric Knife

The Fiskars fabric knife* has three different blades that can be switched out. (My favorite blade is the buttonhole blade.) One of of the blades is a knife that can be used to cut through threads.

The handle is a good size, and it’s a nice weight. The knife is nice and sharp, and the metal is smooth. I don’t use the fabric knife to cute individual threads, but I use it to cut the thread through the seam.

This fabric knife works best when opening up a hem.

This fabric knife came in fifth place of all the seam rippers, but only because I love using the buttonhole blade.

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Slice Manuel Seam Ripper

The Slice seam ripper has a blade that can come up and down like a box cutter.

The handle is a good size, but it’s a good weight. The knife was sharp, but there was no point. It’s not sharp enough to cut your skin if you touch it. The knife is not made out of metal, so it can’t rust.

This seam ripper would work well if you don’t want to use metal, and you want replaceable blades to reduce waste.

This seam ripper came in last place of all the seam rippers.

Which do you think is the best seam ripper? Please share it on social media with the hashtag #heatherhandmade and tag me!

best seam ripper

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My favourite seam ripper is the Clover. I love the sharpness, and that it doesn’t roll away when I put it on the table. I have been using the same one for about 10 years now and it is as sharp as ever.

I bought a purple, double ended ergonomic seam ripper. I think it is “Smartneedle” – but the small end metal part is too thick for going through individual stitches. I’ve been using the Janome ripper that came with my machine. It doesn’t have the red blob though and while I do like it and it has the cover to make it longer, the lid never stays on. My friend bought me a Pyrm and while it is OK, I find I am using it further down the shaft which renders the ergonomic design pretty useless. I bought myself a Clover – and that is my favourite . . . but I keep using the Janome because I don’t want to wear out my Clover one! Daft or what!!!
A very interesting review – and glad the Clover was one of the best! Thank you.

It is not because I love the seam rippers, but because I misplace them. I buy the bunch of mini rippers on Amqzon. I forget the price, but they are cheap. I also maintain several small tins and zipper packs filled with pins, needles, a small scissors, cheap tape measure, and seam ripper. If I’m going somewhere that I know I may have to wait, I take my sewing project, grab a tin and throw it in a tote. I have at least 5 of these packets floating around. This helps to get small projects done or do a bit piece on larger projects, especially a quick basting job.

I like a seam ripper with the ball on the tip, and it has to be a smooth feel to the pick that I might use to just unsew a few stitches but also smooth going if I want to just rip a seam
Clover and Dritz have reliable quality. they are not expensive and sometimes I get one I an not in love with and I give it away to the local sewing school (Sew Magarbo)
I am currently using a ripper called Seam Fix with the silicone end
I have the shorter ones and they fit in my carry along bag too.
You have created a very good review